Tag Archives: screened porch

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Screened in Porch – Reveal!

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Panorama of my favorite seat

Finally the day is here! My porch reveal!!

Most of the stuff I purchased, nearly all, came from World Market. If you have a question about where I got anything – please ask!

Left corner with screen door in right corner

Left corner with screen door in right corner

The table is actually a potting bench from World Market that I plan to turn into a bar 🙂

Extra seating and storage directly off living room door

Extra seating and storage directly off living room door

This isn’t the best picture but the stools to the left and right of the bench are a red color. We plan on adding a fold away eating area here for the hot days when the kids are wet and hungry 🙂

Seating area to right of living room door

Seating area to right of living room door

My favorite area of the porch! These sling chairs were a score at World Market – $75 for both!

Panorama of my favorite seat

Panorama of my favorite seat

We have plans to add some seating where the cushions are in the bottom left of the panorama – something that is custom since we have that stone ledge there.

That is all for my reveal! I hope you enjoyed these past few posts about us building our screened porch!

Keep Reclaiming!

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Screened In Porch – Part 2

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Time for part 2 of the screened in porch!

So after letting that concrete dry, we were ready to start putting up the posts. We decided to do the posts 36″ apart because that was the width of the screen material that we had on hand. Sure, you can do larger spans, but I figured the less space between, the less likely the screen will get ripped!

So we pulled out our handy dandy air hammer drill to drill holes for some railroad spikes we had on hand. This would serve as an anchor to hold the bracket in place for the 4x4s. This was some TOUGH work, by the end of all the posts the bit was completely toast. We secured the posts to the top board with a large nut and bolt. Unfortunately, I forgot to take pictures of this process… it was pretty intensive and I had to help hold the posts as they were being bolted in.

Once we got the posts in place, it was time to work on the banisters. They aren’t necessary, but with a dog who is known to break through screens (sorry grandma!), I decided we needed these. We simple measured between each 4×4 and then cut the 2×4. We didn’t mass line this, we did one by one since some posts were original and slightly twisted. After the 2x4s were cut, we cut a LOT of 1x1s to serve as the spokes. This was an easy mass line: I measured while the hubby cut away!

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To secure the 1x1s to the 2x4s, we drilled holes in the 2x4s – marking it after measuring distance. Then we also drilled a hole in the end of the 1×1. Pre-drilling saves the hassle of a hard time hammering in place – this can be tricky when it is freestanding.  To attach, we used some flat galvanized nails, 3″ in length. I put the nails into the 2x4s – be careful to NOT step on this! then I added the 1x1s. You might need an extra hand to get the second 2×4 on – these little 1x1s move a lot!

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Valspar Duramax

Valspar Duramax

After all these bad boys were put together, it was time to paint. This is a long and tedious process. If I had to do it over again, I would have painted the banisters apart rather than together with all the nooks and crannies. I swear by Valspar’s Duramax – it is a nice thick paint that helps hide any dents and comes with a 25 year warranty! Cannot beat that!

Painting done – this took 3 coats, it was time to put them into place. We used an all purpose adhesive like liquid nails to secure the base of the banister to the concrete and then screwed the top into place.

We reused the storm door that came off of the garage door, simply screwed it directly into the 4x4s. The next step will be the screen – but that is a whole new project in itself!

Stay tuned for part 3! You can find part 1 here and part 3 here. Keep Reclaiming!

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Screened In Porch – Part 1

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So THIS is my exciting post! A screened in porch! Tennessee can have some pretty amazing temperatures in the spring and fall. For half the year we can open the windows and enjoy the cool mornings or warmer afternoons. We have had some uncharacteristically cool mornings and it has me wanting to be outside. The con: mosquitoes. We even have cases of West Nile here! Solution – screened in porch.

Back door from living room

Back door from living room

We have a fairly large back patio that is covered- 30′ x 10′. I figured we could easily just add some 2×4’s and some screen and viola! we have a screened in porch. If only it were that easy! But alas, our back patio has some serious water drainage issues with two areas that pool water. So we would have to build up or insert a drain.

Water pooling in corner of porch - this happens every time it rains

Water pooling in corner of porch – this happens every time it rains

We decided to build up and add a drain, just not the entire length of the porch. The first thing we had to do was cut into the concrete. We rented a concrete saw from the local home improvement store. That saw had to be the coolest tool we have rented. It ripped through that concrete like BUTTER! We cut through two large sections of concrete in less than an hour! We thought it would take much longer!

So we cut straight lines from one corner out to create a drain to run water off the patio in the shortest distance possible. We did the same in the other corner. Overall, we were quite pleased with the first step in this long process. This is what it looked like after we removed the concrete pieces (used a sledgehammer to loosen it up).

I was in a rush to get this porch completed, so we started to lay out the concrete wall base. You can see it in the above picture with the 2x4s laying on the ground. This served as a form for the new concrete we mixed and poured into place. Only mix one bag of crete at a time – anything more than that and it will solidify on you, unless of course you have an actual mixer 🙂 After you put some concrete in the form, dampen it down with a trowel. The more you dampen the bigger rocks move to the bottom of the concrete and the finer sand will come to the top. This is KEY! Dampen! Dampen! Dampen! If you don’t, then it will turn out all rocky and we just couldn’t have that. Below are the after concrete pour.

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We had two supervisors during this entire job. They approved of our excellent craftsmanship 🙂

See part 2 here and part 3 here. Keep Reclaiming!